Census Bureau Launches “Children Count Too” Awareness Campaign

Census Bureau Launches “Children Count Too” Awareness Campaign Featuring Nickelodeon’s Dora the Explorer

The U.S. Census Bureau today launched a “Children Count Too” public awareness campaign reminding parents to include babies and young children on their 2010 Census forms. Most of the nation’s 120 million households will begin receiving census questionnaires by mail between March 15 andMarch 17.”A complete and accurate count of our nation’s youngest is critical to their health and education, and the future strength of our communities and labor force,” said Census Bureau Director Robert Groves at a news conference at Mary’s Center, a nonprofit maternal and child care center serving immigrant communities in Washington.

The campaign features Dora the Explorer ― the popular children’s character on Nickelodeon’s award-winning animated preschool series ― addressing the importance of counting kids in the 2010 Census. In partnership with the Census Bureau, Nickelodeon has produced television and radio public service announcements, Web buttons and fact sheets in which Dora and her friends remind families that “everybody counts on the census form, especially little kids.” All materials are available in English and Spanish.

“We’ve arrived at a crossroads in American history where it’s more important than ever for all of us to stand up and be counted,” said Samantha Maltin, senior vice president for integrated marketing and partnerships at Nickelodeon. “Dora the Explorer is an iconic bilingual character for American families of all backgrounds, and with her help, Nickelodeon will remind families how easy, important and safe it is to participate in the census.”

As part of this initiative, federal, corporate and nonprofit organizations with unique access to families and child care providers will distribute Children Count Too educational materials. Mead Johnson Nutrition Company, a world leader in infant and children’s nutrition, will use its connection with parents of newborns and online resources to communicate the importance of including children in the 2010 Census to more than 1 million families.

In addition, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Division of Food and Nutrition Services is displaying 2010 Census posters and Dora the Explorer-themed 2010 Census fact sheets in more than 3,000 Women, Infants, and Children and 4,100 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program local offices. Other key partners include the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies.

Impact of undercounting children

Children have been undercounted in every census since the first one in 1790. According to a December 2009 report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, children under age 5 are missed at a higher rate than any other age group. “The undercount of kids is startling, but it is not a new problem,” said William O’Hare, a demographer and consultant working for the Annie E. Casey Foundation. “With combined efforts at the federal, state and local levels, we have a chance to improve on the past and make sure the youngest members of our society are fully counted.” Census data are used to determine the allocation of more than $400 billion in federal funding annually, including $26 billion for educational services and other programs focused on children. Some of these programs include:

· Temporary Assistance for Needy Families: $16.5 billion

· Title I grants for education: $12.8 billion

· Special education: $10.8 billion

· Women, Infants, and Children: $5.5 billion

· Title IV-E Foster Care: $4.7 billion

· Child Care & Development Block Grant: $5 billion

“Every child counted in the 2010 Census will help identify communities in need and bring resources to address specific vulnerabilities, whether they are in health care, child care, education, transportation and affordable housing,” said Mary’s Center President and CEO Maria Gomez. “Only through well-funded comprehensive and multiservice programs will places like Mary’s Center be able to have an impact on the nation’s health care outcomes.” Local communities rely on census information in planning for schools, child care, health and other critical services. Additionally, community-based and social service organizations use census data to determine social services requirements for families with children.

Links

Television PSA (:30 English):

http://2010.census.gov/mediacenter/spread-message/dora.php

Television PSA (:30 Spanish):

http://2010.census.gov/multimedia/video/psa/dora.php

Radio PSA (:15 English):

http://2010.census.gov/mediacenter/spread-message/radio-dora.php

Radio PSA (:15 Spanish):

http://2010.census.gov/multimedia/sonido/psa/dora-radio.php

Dora Fact Sheet (English):

http://2010.census.gov/partners/pdf/factSheet_Dora.pdf

Dora Fact Sheet (Spanish):

http://2010.census.gov/partners/pdf/factSheet_Dora_sp.pdf

Dora Web Buttons (English, Spanish):

http://2010.census.gov/partners/toolkits/toolkits-dora.php

Annie E. Casey Foundation December 2009 Report:

http://www.aecf.org/~/media/Pubs/Other/W/WhoAreYoungChildrenMissedSoOftenintheCensus/final%20census%20undercount%20paper.pdf

ABOUT THE 2010 CENSUS

The 2010 Census is a count of everyone living in the United States and is mandated by the U.S. Constitution. Census data are used to apportion congressional seats to states, to distribute more than $400 billion in federal funds to tribal, state and local governments each year and to make decisions about what community services to provide. The 2010 Census form will be one of the shortest in U.S. history, consisting of 10 questions, taking about 10 minutes to complete. Strict confidentiality laws protect the respondents and the information they provide.

-X-

Editor’s note: News releases, reports and data tables are available on the Census Bureau’s home page. Go to <http://www.census.gov&gt; and click on “Releases.”

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: